To Proc or Not to Proc

I’ve had some interesting conversations and fun arguments about how to author queries for SQL Server Report Services (SSRS) reports. There are a lot of professionals out there who really want hard fast answers on best practices. The challenge with SSRS is the multitude of configurations available for the system. Is everything (Database Engine, SSAS, SSRS, and SSIS) on one box? Is every service on a dedicated box? Is SSRS integrated with a SharePoint cluster? Where are the hardware investments made in the implementation?

Those are a lot of variables to try and make universal best practices for. Lucky for us Microsoft provided a tool to help troubleshoot report performance. Within the Report Server database there is a view called ExecutionLog3. ExecutionLog3 links together various logging tables in the Report Server database. Here are some of the more helpful columns exposed.

  •          ItemPath – The path and report names that was executed in this record.
  •          UserName – The User the report was ran as.
  •          Format – Format the report was rendered in (PDF, CSV, HTML4.0, etc.)?
  •          Parameters – Prompt selections made.
  •          TimeStart – Server local date and time the prport was executed.
  •          TimeEnd – Server local date and time the report finished rendering.
  •          TimeDataRetrieval – Amount of time in milliseconds to get report data from data source.
  •          TimeProcessing – Amount of time in milliseconds SSRS took to process the results.
  •          TimeRendering – Amount of time in milliseconds Required to produce the final output (PDF, CSV, HTML4.0, etc.)
  •          Status – Succeeded, Failed, Aborted, etc.

I always provide two reports based on the information found in this view. The first report utilizes the time columns to give me insight into how the reports are performing and when the systems peaks utilization. The second report focuses on which users are using what reports to gauge the effectiveness of the reports to the audience.

Generally I’m a big fan for stored procedures, mostly because my reports are usually related to a common data source and stored procedures provide me with a lot of code reuse. Standardizing, the report prompt behavior with stored procedures is also a handy tool. A simple query change can cascade to all the reports that use a stored procedure, alleviating the need to open each report and perform the same change. Additionally, I like to order the result sets in SQL not after the data is returned to the report. But that doesn’t mean that you’re not going to find better performance moving some functionality between tiers based on the results you find in ExecutionLog3.

I’m sorry there just isn’t a one size fits all recommendation for how SSRS reports are structured. Which means; 1 you’ll have to do some research on your configuration, and 2 don’t accept a consultant’s dogma on the topic.

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